MB and UZ last heard lists

We were asked by some folks at Blackpool rally to add a few links to the last heard pages, the web pages where you can see who’s been using the repeater and what their rough signal quality was like into them.
So here we are, First link is to the Phoenix last heard list for GB7MB:

GB7MB Last heard list   (these links open in a new browser tab)
and GB7UZ below,
GB7UZ Last heard list

So .. Hope that helps..

–Hax–
All work, text and images © GB7MB

GB7UZ (Lancaster) operational, and Linked to GB7MB on TG9 (TAC9)

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To aid coverage of our existing GB7MB repeater around the Bay area, another DMR  MotoTrbo repeater was set up in Lancaster, the date of NoV Issue was on 16th Mar 2016, and it seems to help in some places wher MB was struggling, due to local terrain and limitations we have for sites.

GB7UZ is, Like GB7MB, connected to the Phoenix UK DMR c-bridge, and ‘Talkgroup 9, slot 2’ on both repeaters is linked.. how it works is very simple, and you dont need to do anything at all, You can have a QSO with one station on MB and the other person on UZ. There are further additions planned for expansion to the system, in order to give Total Area Coverage.. maybe on other bands and modes, as the spirit of Amateur radio is experimentation, and so watch this space.

-Hax-
All work, text and images © GB7MB

GB7MB Talkgroups

List of current Talkgroups on GB7MB

TIME SLOT 1

TG1 WORLD WIDE,
TG2 EUROPE,
TG9 LOCAL SECONDARY,
TG13 ENGLISH WORLD WIDE
TG80 UK WIDE USER ACTIVATED 1 (INCL. MALTA 9H1DMR)
TG81 UK WIDE USER ACTIVATED 2 (INCL. MALTA 9H1DMR)
TG113 ENGLISH WORLD WIDE USER ACTIVATED 1,
TG119 WORLD WIDE USER ACTIVATED 1
TG123 ENGLISH WORLD WIDE USER ACTIVATED 2,
TG129 WORLD WIDE USER ACTIVATED 2
TG235 UK WIDE (INCL. MALTA 9H1DMR),

TIME SLOT 2,
TG9 LOCAL (PRIMARY)

TG820 NW ENGLAND BR , CA , HM , LP , MB , MR & PN -Hax- All work, text and images © GB7MB

Dial-a-repeater !

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Direct Dial – as it’s known, is available on GB7MB – but what is it ? well, it’s good news from the Guys who run the kindly run the British c-Bridge over at www.cc-3.net and good news for British DMR-MARC Repeater users in general.
Quite simply, it allows you to direct your call to a specific DMR repeater – rather than ‘lighting up’ all the other repeaters inbetween, As you know, we have two timeslots (channels) on a DMR repeater, and so, careful selection of talkgroups must be chosen in order to make best possible use of both repeater channels (slots) ..  leaving a slot on the repeater available to locals at all times, while at the same time providing non-local connections. Being able to chat to your friend on another DMR-MARC connected repeater (without tying up any other repeaters) is a sure win for DMR-MARC users in the UK.
The talkgroup times out after 5 minutes, so does not constantly relay unwanted traffic to your home repeater.

This ability is enabledand you can now add these new talkgroups to your codeplug now.
GB7MB is TG 915

For the full list of Talkgroups to program in, visit the DMR USERS Forum.

Hax
All work, text and images © GB7MB

GB7MB changes to new UK c-bridge


bridge

As the end of March draws nearer, so does the date for all UK DMR-MARC repeaters to switch over from the the German  SmartPTT server that we were all using, to a new British c-bridge by the Guys at   http://www.cc-3.net/ 

GB7MB was swapped over to the UK c-bridge at 21:40 approx on 18 March 2015, and also talkgroup hang time was reduced back down to 1 second, as we dropped UK wide which was deprecated to slot 1 and Local TG 9 no longer needs to keep hold of slot 2 for main local usage. GB7MB users will likely have noticed no changes.

Hax
All work, text and images © GB7MB

Updated (Feb 2015) Get a DMR-MARC ID


Bit of an update on the previously linked “Get a DMR-MARC ID” post here on Facebook.. The original link is invalid or broken (again) so you can use this link to get your ID.. Get Your DMR-MARC subscriber id number here below:

 Click here to get your DMR-MARC ID number

if you are not near a DMR repeater – – in the form, Home Repeater, you can enter any repeater .. Of course we type GB7MB in there..  🙂

Hax

All work, text and images © GB7MB

Monday 9th Feb 2015 – UK Wide goes slot 1 only

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On Monday, you might notice a little UK wide confusion … to be more precise, the keepers of almost all UK DMR-MARC connected repeaters have decided to carry only UK Wide TG 235 on slot 1 and drop UK Wide TG235 on slot 2.

GB7MB was an early adopter of this idea, because, as previously mentioned, it was seen shortly after GB7MB came on-air, that the system was unuseable for long periods, being unavailable to local users and giving the “Channel Busy” error, and then beeping at you annoyingly, because slot 2 was busy with non local traffic.   Absurd..

It is a little like keeping your front door open and letting anyone use your house regardless, while you try to carry on living there, you won’t get chance to sit in your own chair, make a cup of tea in your own kitchen, or sleep in your own bed at night, but you’ll still have to keep paying the bills….

As is often stated, GB7MB is here for us, the local users first and foremost, that’s it. anything else that DMR-MARC can offer, and that *may* be beneficial, like TG8 roaming, is great, but all that is all purely secondary to its primary function, if it adds features to GB7MB fine, if it hinders, well, you get the picture.

So go into your DM4600 DP4800 menu & change UK wide 235 to slot 1, or if you have not read our FPP article (shame on you) get your CPS or prgramming software out and change your UK wide TG 235 to slot 1 only…

Oh the picture ?  it’s just two slots..

All work, text and images © GB7MB

TG 8 Roaming and a – gloaming..

roaming

Ok, I know the photo is of a cellular phone mast, but The news is that Talkgroup 8 (slot 2) is now enabled on GB7MB, enabling users on neighbouring DMR-MARC repeaters to have their own ‘local’ group. This is usually called in your radios’ codeplug, TG 8 Roaming or TG 8 Regional – or variations thereof.  You may hear users from our friends GB7HM repeater in Caergywrie North Wales, or GB7PN Prestatyn  or GB7LP in Liverpool or GB7NM in Manchester.
This new Talkgroup 8 (slot 2) now, for us on GB7MB, takes pressure off the increasingly busier UK wide (TG 235)

In Use..
If the station you wish to communicate with is on either of those semi-local repeaters listed above, instead of using UK Wide, as you had to do before (tying up a slot on all UK repeaters) – you can now call them on the new TG8 roaming and leave UK Wide free for others who are speaking between repeaters who do not have roaming set up yet, and the only way for them to communicate is by using the (rather inefficient, but useful) UK wide talkgroup, which is now on slot 1 remember, almost all DMR-MARC repeaters nationwide from Monday 9th Feb onwards.

Remember that, like on any repeater talkgroup (except TG 9 local)  when you transmit, you are also simultaneously being broadcast through all repeaters that are on that talkgroup, on TG 8 roaming, that means you are being heard on GB7HM, GB7LP, GB7PN and GB7NM all at the same time, a little unusual if you are new to DMR-MARC, but remember this also allows a QSO from any or all these repeaters to listen or join in as they see fit.

Roaming, on compatible sets, is particularly useful for mobile operators wishing to stay in contact throughout their journey, while passing through several repeater coverage areas without switching channels, the radio does this automatically, based on which repeater it sees as strongest in your given location, for example while in range of GB7MB it all works as normal, you can be chatting to your friend on GB7PN (it’s TG8 remember..) and when you leave range of GB7MB, your radio will automatically switch you to the strongest repeater that it has identified (in its roaming list that you programmed in the CPS) which may be in our case, GB7HM or GB7NM or GB7LP – as you pass by those areas.
Programming your CPS to do this is not as tricky as it sounds, and it’s only slightly different between sets, more of which, will be coming in a later article.

All work, text and images © GB7MB

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